New Jersey's 39th Legislative District

Senator Holly Schepisi

Senator Holly Schepisi

Schepisi Calls for NJDOH to Release Data on Effectiveness of COVID-19 Vaccines for Children

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NY State Research Shows Benefits ‘Declined Rapidly’ for Kids Ages 5 to 11

After New York State released an analysis of data finding “limited evidence of effectiveness” with rapid decline after less than one month for the COVID-19 vaccine given to young children, Senator Holly Schepisi called on the Murphy administration to be transparent and release similar data for New Jersey.

After New York State released an analysis of data finding “limited evidence of effectiveness” with rapid decline after less than one month for the COVID-19 vaccine given to young children, Sen. Holly Schepisi called on the Murphy administration to be transparent and release similar data for New Jersey. (©iStock)

“Parents wrestling with decisions about getting COVID shots for their children should have access to the latest research, the best evidence about vaccines and their effectiveness,” said Schepisi (R-39). “There’s no reason the Governor should be sitting on hard data and real numbers that will shed light on the effectiveness of vaccines on youngsters. Transparency is essential, especially where children’s health is concerned.”

The New York Times reported Monday that Pfizer’s inoculation is “much less effective in preventing infection in children ages 5 to 11 years than in older adolescents or adults” with a rapid and substantial decline in protection in less than one month after vaccination in children in the younger age group. The study also found a significant, but less steep, decline in protection against hospitalizations.

The findings were based on an extensive data compiled by New York state health between December 13, 2021 and January 31, 2022 which analyzed data from 852,384 newly vaccinated adolescents aged 12 to 17 and 365,502 children aged 5 to 11.  Over that period, two-dose vaccine protections against infection for kids aged 5 to 11 declined from 68% to 12%; while the vaccine’s effectiveness at preventing hospitalization declined from 100% to 48%.

“These details have significant ramifications for medical professionals, parents, youngsters and even members of the legislature as they contemplate strategies for navigating vaccine mandates for schools and elsewhere,” Schepisi noted. “Additional findings from New Jersey’s data would help clear up misconceptions and rumors, allowing parents to make educated decisions.”

The NYT reported that the findings posted online on Monday “come on the heels of clinical trial results indicating that the vaccine fared poorly in children aged 2 to 4 years.”

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